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  • 106

FAA Initial Report on Jack Roush Accident

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This is the preliminary report filed by the investigators on the accident at KOSH on July 27, 2010. (www.ntsb.gov) More...

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julianjim
jim garrity 0
Before you open YOUR hanger door mouth,learn how much time in type as well as the many other types of aircraft (I wish I had) this fine gentalman has. Please be respectal,and speedy recovery to him and his passenger.
ruagatr
ruagatr 0
Strike 3 for Jack Roush. In 2002 he is hotdogging through Alabama and hits powerlines at 50 feet and goes in a lake. Only a miraculous rescue by a lakeside bystander saves his life. Then he taxis his P-51 Mustang into the back of a plane, chewing it up with his propeller. Now he almost kills himself, a passenger and nearly folks on the ground by getting behind the airplane and stalling it. Time for a professional pilot for sure...I don't care how much time he has--his JUDGMENT is lacking...
Flyboy85
Flyboy85 0
Just for you all to know, Jack Roush is an experienced pilot with (most likely) many times the experience and time that any of you hangar talking guys can dream of having. I, too, believe that he was simply behind the airplane, but let's face it, every one of us gets in that position at least from time to time. You know you've been there before so don't lie and act like you're holier than thou. Lets face it, when you get as many hours in a cockpit as he has, unless you're a top notch pilot, you're going to have accidents as well.

Not defending the guy nessecarily, but you all should maybe think about the words that come out of your mouth before they polute the internet with your shallow filth...
indy2001
indy2001 0
With all due respect to Mr. Roush, I would say 3 crashes in less than 10 years indicates a problem. Who knows at this point whether it is judgement, the ability to stay ahead of the aircraft, or just plain bad luck. The NTSB/FAA will eventually come up with that answer. But something certainly seems to be amiss. While it is unfortunate that he lost sight in one eye, perhaps that injury will extend his life significantly by keeping him out of the pilot's seat. After all, he has enough money to hire a personal pilot so that his hectic NASCAR lifestyle may continue unabated.
chalet
chalet 0
I agree with indy2001's comments, 3 crashes in less than 10 years is awful, you don't find this terrible rate of accidents not even in 3rd and 4th world countries which have a marked tendency not too abide by the aviation regulations. Just tell me guys, suppose that just 5% of the pilots in the U.S. had that rate of accidents, the NTSB's resources would run out in hours. Mr. Roush had God as his Copilot and Saviour, no question. By the way in the case of the accident in an Alabama lake Jack Roush was pulled out of 10 ft. of water by a retired Marine who happened to be in the vicinity. I would like to the opportunity to wish Mr. Roush a prompt recovery although the loss of one eye is bad enough.
sabrady
Robert Brady 0
No matter what is discussed here, thank goodness that they survived the impact. It is a hell of a note to loose the aircraft, but if Jack can still buy them, then he can fly them however he chooses.
rotorwingzzz
rotorwingzzz 0
It doesn't matter how much time a pilot has in their logbook. Consistent emergency procedure training is the key. A pilot can seem to be proficient in one aircraft, but the emergency procedures may be different in another. A low time pilot with consistent and recent practice in emergency procedures can be more capable of recognizing and recovering than a high time pilot that may do the actual procedures once, maybe twice a year. Consistent training is the key, not just experience, as well as recognizing what you are capable of. Wishing a speedy recovery for Jack.
20U60N4
STEVE EMERY 0
I'm sure he's a great guy, but 3 in 10, are you kidding me???

Indy speaks the facts Jack...Money can't buy me love...or pilot skills
jtblohm
Jorge Blohm 0
Mr Roush is alive, a rarity in accidents like this one. How about waiting to hear his side of the story? He'll most likely share the experience and do his best to prevent anyone of us from getting into the situation he found himself in. I whish him a speedy recovery and hope to hear from him next year.
20U60N4
STEVE EMERY 0
He doesn't drive his racecars...he needs to hire a pilot
zenballwizard
Bill Webb 0
Time in the seat means nothing when the seat's in the ditch, and idolization of a famous man shouldn't get in the way of the fact that his safety record is dismal. Proficiency is the name of the game, and if you can't fly like a pro, then don't try to play with big boy toys. Bottom line: you don't make low speed, low altitude course corrections in swept-wing jets. They tell you that in jet schoo. I too wish Mr. Roush a speedy recovery...and a top-notch pro to watch over him the next time he initiates a landing in a transport category aircraft.
6540E
john johnson 0
Looking at the injury to the face.....any one know if he had his shoulder harness on? or did the seat fail, and go foreward?
compilot73
Tom Wesche 0
To me it sounds like he caused a accelerated stall. When he over shot the center line then made a steep bank turn to realign himself he could of caused a accelerated stall. With the aircraft in a landing configuration this just added on to the problems. If there was a accelerated stall he would of changed his bank and pitched down based on what the video showed that is exactly what he did. However we all know when you make a steep bank with slow airspeed and throttle near idle you loose altitude. I think he might of started the recovery and because of being so low pulled back and caused a wing stall causing the aircraft to hit the ground hard. It does not matter whether you are flying a cessna 152 or a airbus the laws of aerodynamics stay constant.
compilot73
Tom Wesche 0
To me it sounds like he caused a accelerated stall. When he over shot the center line then made a steep bank turn to realign himself he could of caused a accelerated stall. With the aircraft in a landing configuration this just added on to the problems. If there was a accelerated stall he would of changed his bank and pitched down based on what the video showed that is exactly what he did. However we all know when you make a steep bank with slow airspeed and throttle near idle you loose altitude. I think he might of started the recovery and because of being so low pulled back and caused a wing stall causing the aircraft to hit the ground hard. It does not matter whether you are flying a cessna 152 or a airbus the laws of aerodynamics stay constant.
compilot73
Tom Wesche 0
To me it sounds like he caused a accelerated stall. When he over shot the center line then made a steep bank turn to realign himself he could of caused a accelerated stall. With the aircraft in a landing configuration this just added on to the problems. If there was a accelerated stall he would of changed his bank and pitched down based on what the video showed that is exactly what he did. However we all know when you make a steep bank with slow airspeed and throttle near idle you loose altitude. I think he might of started the recovery and because of being so low pulled back and caused a wing stall causing the aircraft to hit the ground hard. It does not matter whether you are flying a cessna 152 or a airbus the laws of aerodynamics stay constant.
5676
craig cihlar 0
Jack has blamed ATC for puting him in conflict with another aircraft.
gsmith4151
harold smith 0
I dont care if he has 10,000 hours in the space shuttle, three accidents in nine years means it is time to hang it up. Be a man, dont blame atc for your lack of situational awareness and failure to do the correct thing. When it goes bad, go around.
20U60N4
STEVE EMERY 0
blame schmame...he was VMC/VFR!
20U60N4
STEVE EMERY 0
blame schmame...he was VMC/VFR!
c402c1
Jeff Cox 0
Experience doesn't make you a safe pilot. Good judgment, proficiency, and attention to the task at hand does, Like that old saying goes. Surperior pilots are those that use their superior judgment to keep themselves out of situations requiring the use of their superior skills..
meister808
I was there, the thing hit the ground 100 yd from where I was standing - I'm sorry, but we wouldn't be talking about a crash today if the pilot would have GONE AROUND from a very poor and unstabilized approach. It doesn't matter if you're in a J3 or a swept-wing jet, you have to know when to hold 'em and you have to know when to fold 'em. Mr. Roush's inability to do this endangered several hundred lives. Lucky bastard, I wish him the best.
klickert
Karla Lickert 0
I don't know if anyone has heard this yet, if so, sorry for the duplication. By the way, I am amazed at the number of junior FAA investigators on this thread. Why not wait to hear what the FAA rules before making a judgement?

http://www.avweb.com/other/oshcrash.mp3
20U60N4
STEVE EMERY 0
because it's the Gov't Karla...the FAA should have pulled his ticket after #2

Keith is right, lucky Mr. Dumasse didn't kill innocent folks on the ground
weisops
weisops 0
We are tought from day one in our training that if you don't like the sourroundings change them. If he didn't feel comfortable then go-around no matter where you are or at a towered airport or not. While doing my training at Flight Safety (for Citations) they tell you from day one fly a stable approach if you don't go around and do it right! I have flown to Oshkosh many times and never got rushed or rushed the aircraft in front of me. You are in command NOT ATC.
chalet
chalet 0
Karla, indeed we have to wait for what the FAA and NTSB have to say after completing the investigations, the problem is that his previous accidents, two of them!! will not have any bearing in the report about the one in OSH, unfortunately. As far as I know each investigation and the ensuing condemnation, if any, is a separate matter from any previous events.
CaptainArt
After over 40yrs of flying with out an accident, I can say he has a problem. I have no problem having my family and grand kids fly with an average pilot with good judgment than a high time pilot with poor judgment. For those that defend him, why? Having shown his poor judgment tells me that I would never allow any of my family member to fly with him. Would you?
Kjoden44
Ken Oden 0
There seems to be a dramatic difference between exposure and experience. I've driven thousands of hours around town in my automobile. That does not make me a NASCAR driver. Jack has flown thousands of hours in several types of exotic aircraft. That may have given him exposure, but there seems to be a question as to his judgement and professionalism. My final comment:
Jack, you're on the mend - good for you. Now get the cheapest insurance you'll ever buy: a full time safety pilot to fly with you no matter what you insist upon flying around.
FlyBoyDC10
FlyBoyDC10 0
Keith is right...I was there also. Don't need the "offficial FAA rendition". Poor judgement on Mr. Roush's part, jepordized all of our
freedom to fly. Consider the impact of closing the Oshkosh Airport after the crash. Hundreds of pilots were denied takeoff and landing because of his poor judgement. One more reason to consider your fellow pilot, before you commit a stupid act. My 2 cents.
whgouner
Warren Gouner 0
I was there. VFR/VMC, traffic conflict?, just go around. Everyone lives to fly again and none of the toys are broken.
gftt
gftt 0
Hey Mr. Roush, have you orderd a new jet?
If so, what make & type?
I'd be honored to make a flight with you in the new ride.

Thank you
gft
Kjoden44
Ken Oden 0
To: gftt
I'm glad to hear you'd be honored to fly with Jack. Lot's of luck my friend. Would you and your family feel safe riding in back with a one eyed, 69 year old pilot with three accidents to his credit? Better check first to see if he'll ever qualify for hull or liability insurance again. And then there's the issue of whether he'll ever see his license or medical certificate again.
gftt
gftt 0
Gee Ken,
I appreciate your concern but I wasn't planning on sitting in the back.
chalet
chalet 0
To gfft, are you qualified to fly jets; no more accidents, please. (ha-ha, just joking).
Kjoden44
Ken Oden 0
To: All
Perhaps I do take these comments more seriously than most writers on these sites. I am a professional pilot; I soloed 44 years ago and flew tailhook fighters in the Navy until Viet Nam was over. Went to the airlines and flew everything Boeing & Douglas built in the last 30 years. After age 60 retirement I hooked up with a charter Part 135 operation where I'm currently the chief pilot. I do fly "safety" or insurance pilot for a lot of people you'd recognize or at least know by name. It's a job I enjoy and one that can be challenging because some big money egos in a small cockpit can make for "close quarters." But I feel I've kept many wealthy people (and their family) out of the trees and off of the rocks, so I must be doing something right. I hope Jack recovers and I hope he will look for a "safety or insurance" pilot as somebody (insurance, FAA and/or family) will require that he have one before he's allowed to fly again. Remember this classic quote: "The J-3 Cub is almost the safest airplane in the world because it can fly high enough to just barely kill you."
bobmacnicol
There certainly can be a problem when a highly successful and extremely rich person gets involved in an enterprise that’s outside the expertise that allowed for the original success and wealth. Quite often people in that situation come to think that expertise in one field will transfer into another. They may even begin to think that they are smarter than the next guy, which in the original case they probably were. But it doesn’t always transfer. I fly as a safety pilot with just such a man, and I am continually impressed how quickly he will accept my input, and if necessary, how quickly he will relinquish the controls. This person is very intelligent, very rich, and very aware of his own limitations. In thirty years of flying he’s never even scratched an aircraft. And most of that time he’s flown helicopters.
kb9uwu
He just totally lost sight in one eye, I don't know how much more PIC time he will have.
20U60N4
STEVE EMERY 0
seems he has more of a judgement/reflexes issue
FlyBoyDC10
FlyBoyDC10 0
Hey Ken, I saw a Navy formation go by recently.......same way, same day. You're the new guy on this site (6/10). Don't feel like you have to convince the world.

From
a Thud driver (F-105)
julianjim
jim garrity 0
Thank you very much FlyBoyDC10, I hope he gets it? (B727-100/200)
Kjoden44
Ken Oden 0
FlyBoy, I flew MiG CAP for a lot of Thud missions. Watched a lot of airplanes go downtown, didn't always see them (all) come out. I do have a lot of respect for you and your mission. Guess you flew the Diesel 10 at some time after your tour in the Air Corps.... But to you and Jim (who at least will sign his name) I didn't know there was a seniority list on this site. Thanks for setting me straight on that one. O & O
randy3
randy3 0
This certainly says something about the integrity of the Premier. #6 accident that people open the cabin door and walk away from a totaled aircraft....
Relath
Bob Lathrop 0
Bottom line here is that I would'nt hire him to fly for me.

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