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Lockheed EC-121 Constellation (VH-EAG) - Historical Aircraft Restoration Society (VH-EAG) Lockheed Super Constellation Connie parked at Wagga Wagga Airport.
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Lockheed EC-121 Constellation (VH-EAG)

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Historical Aircraft Restoration Society (VH-EAG) Lockheed Super Constellation 'Connie' parked at Wagga Wagga Airport.

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Paul Wisgerhof
This is more likely a Lockheed 1049. The EC-121 was a U.S. military electronic countermeasures aircraft. This restoration may have been based on a surplus EC-121, but the restoration is back to the 1049 configuration.
Robert MyersPhoto Uploader
ICAO designator code is "CONI" for all Lockheed Super Constellations, seems that FlightAware incorrectly defaults the "CONI" designator to the EC-121.
sam kuminecz
Robert is correct. The ICAO code covers all variants.
cliff731
Historically it is a C-121C... This aircraft was identified as a Lockheed C-121C in the FAA registry until it was deregistered in 1994. It still retains that identification as a C-121C model in Australia's "Civil Aircraft Register", albeit using Lockheed's factory serial number (4176) rather than the USAF s/n (54-0157) as the FAA registry used.

This Lockheed was originally built to fulfill a military contract as a C-121C with MSN 1049F-4176 and delivered to the United States Air Force MATS in 1955 with an assigned USAF s/n 54-157. She flew with MATS, the MS ANG, the WV ANG, and the PA ANG until being retired in 1977. She was subsequently flown to Davis Monthan AFB and later restored for her trans Pacific flight to Australia with her current Australian civil aviation VH-EAG registration.
gwapo santa
i remember these flying when in negombo ceylon quantas and twa 1959.. sri lanka my father was raf o/c flying
What I remember most about the Constellation is that somewhere around 20,000 feet, the pilot had to shift gears (one engine at a time) in each supercharger (turbocharger?) to account for the rarer atmosphere to get a greater boost at highest altitude.... weird!
What I remember most about the Constellation is that somewhere around 20,000 feet, the pilot had to shift gears (one engine at a time) in each supercharger (turbocharger?) to account for the rarer atmosphere to get a greater boost at highest altitude.... weird!
roland pfeifer
They don't build them like that any more.
Larry Horton
Air America used to fly them. They would land at Robins AFB and taxi out to a remote corner and park for a couple of days.
Lucius Gravely
In one of the more bizarre episodes in American history, The U.S. sent Air Force families to live in war-torn Germany during the Berlin Airlift. My father-in-law flew in the airlift and my mother in law and my later-to-be wife(A first grader) lived in Munich and other locations during that period. They flew over in a Connie and we have the ticket stubs.
Andrew Wilson
My dad flew the RC-121D in the US Air Force, and I love the "Coni" because of it!
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